New vehicles receive a safety rating of 1 to 5 from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and this helps many Michigan residents when choosing what kind to buy. The system, which developed in the 1990s, has also helped to encourage the auto industry in the making of safer vehicles. However, according to one report, the NHTSA is no longer the leader in rating car safety.

The U.S. is lagging behind Europe, Asia and Latin America in the thoroughness of its crash testing. The report gives Europe as an example, saying that it tests its vehicles four times as much as the U.S. before rating safety. The NHTSA must not only add new test procedures but also add ratings for the various safety features that have emerged, such as automatic emergency braking and pedestrian detection.

The agency has promised to make such additions, and it has even stated its intention of making more accurately designed crash test dummies. However, these changes may never come about without sufficient funding and “political will”. Though the report focuses on NHTSA’s car safety rating system, this is obviously not the only factor that drivers consider when purchasing a car. Experts say that data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System can provide motorists with real-world data on how well vehicles protect their occupants.

When motor vehicle collisions take place, drivers and passengers can suffer serious injuries that can require lengthy periods of medical care and treatment. In many cases, victims are unable to return to work during their recovery period. If the accident was caused by a negligent driver or a defective car part, an attorney could be of assistance in helping clients seek appropriate compensation for their losses.