Men possess breast tissue and the lobules (milk-producing glands) and ducts to carry the milk to the nipple. Naturally, these ducts and glands are nonfunctional in most men, but their presence does make men vulnerable to the possibility of developing breast cancer. Residents of Michigan may want to learn more about the most common kinds of breast cancer that afflict males.

At least 8 in 10 males with breast cancer have what’s called invasive ductal carcinoma, which originates in the milk duct and subsequently breaks through the duct’s wall, infecting the surrounding breast tissue. From there, it may spread (metastasize) to other regions in the body. About 1 in 10 male breast cancer patients have ductal carcinoma in situ. This condition alters the cells lining the milk ducts. It is normally noninvasive (“in situ”) but sometimes preinvasive.

Then there is the type of cancer that originates in the milk-producing gland, which is called invasive lobular carcinoma. This condition afflicts 2% of men with breast cancer. One form of breast cancer that affects more men (5%) than women (1%-3%) is called Paget’s disease of the nipple.

It should be noted that most abnormalities that men find in their breasts are benign and, thus, aren’t life-threatening. Gynecomastia, normally caused by hormone imbalances, is the most common breast affliction among men.

Cancer is, along with vascular events and infections, one of the most misdiagnosed of all conditions, and breast cancer is among the most misdiagnosed of cancers. It’s not surprising, then, that many men with breast cancer are initially misdiagnosed. Diagnostic errors can form the basis for a medical malpractice case, though there are many requirements that must be met for a case to be valid. Victims may want a lawyer to help them, especially with settlement negotiations.